Examples

Welcome to our Example Library section!

The aim of this section is to combine many of the examples presented in the website in one place. Most of these examples are real and represent real situations. You can save these images, share them, or PIN them to your Pinterest account.

Examples Gallery
Standard Work
A Standard Work Chart is an example of a visual standard work document. It is used to help with the layout and arrangement of your operation.
Standard Work — SOP
This is an example of a template that can be used to document your standard operating procedure (SOP) for any of your business processes.
Standard Work — SOP
This example illustrates an SOP which was created for the label changeover process in a manufacturing facility.
Standard Work — SOP
This is an example of an SOP which was created for the order process in a service environment.
Observation — Gemba
Customer observation forms can be used to truly understand the viewpoint of customers and how they experience your products and services.
Observation — Gemba
Process observation forms can be used to record the observed data, interview responses, improvement opportunities, and any other useful information.
Visual Management — Safety
Example of visual management in a production line. 1. Safety sign   2. Andon lights   3. Floor marking   4. Machine identity   5. Visual instructions   6. Gauge marking.
Visual Management — Safety
Safety visuals often use bright coloring to attract attention.
Visual Management
Floor marking is used to improve the layout of the workplace and mark critical safety and security areas.
Visual Management
Pipe marking communicates all the necessary information about the pipelines including the content, direction and flow rate. Arrows are used to indicate the flow direction while colors often indicate the nature of the content.
Visual Management - Traffic Light Assessment — Andon
Andon lights are powerful visual tools which are installed on production machines to indicate their current status. They are very useful in bringing immediate attention to problems as soon as they arise.
5 Whys — Why-Why Diagram — Tree Diagram
A restaurant team has constructed a why-why diagram to resolve a complaint regarding the increased number of customer complaints about the taste of the coffee they make.
5 whys
This 5 Whys example is often used during our Lean Six Sigma workshops. Notice the difference between the assumed cause and the root cause.
5 whys
In this example, a team used the 5 Whys approach to determine the reason behind a customer complaint about the delayed test results at a laboratory. Only four Whys were required to get to what looks to be the root cause.
5 whys
This is an example that uses the 5 Whys approach to answer a concern during a Lean Six Sigma workshop. Note that you can carry on asking Why and ask, “why doesn’t maintenance department have a schedule for routine activities?”.

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